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On Demand

90th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association


Duration:
35 Hours 26 Minutes
Format:
Audio and Video


Description

Program Details

This course is available to watch on-demand and receive credit for up to one year from the date of webinar release. There is no live Q&A with faculty associated for this program. 

37.25 credits available until August 31, 2022. View the Accreditation Statement/Credit tab for additional details.​

Included in this webinar:

Sessions from Thursday, September 30, 2021

Plenary: Year in Thyroidology

Victor Bernet, MD, ATA President

Catherine Dinauer, MD, Program Committee Co-Chair

Christine Spitzweg, MD, Program Committee Co-Chair

Antonio Di Cristofano, PhD, “Basic Science Review”        

Megan Haymart, MD, “Clinical Review”

Ralph Tufano, MD, “Surgical Review”

Plenary: Sidney H. Ingbar & Valerie Anne Galton Distinguished Lectureships

Matthew Ringel, MD, “Sidney H. Ingbar Award Lecture: P21 Activated Kinase: A new player in BRAFV600E thyroid cancer development and progression”

Sheue-yann Cheng, PhD, “Valerie A. Galton Award Lecture: Thyroid Hormone Receptor Mutants: Molecular Actions and Roles in Disease”

Highlighted Oral Abstracts Session

Chair: Christine Spitzweg, MD

Arturo Mendoza, PhD, “Oral Abstract 1: Thyroid hormone action in liver fibrosis”

Carolin Kitzberger, “Oral Abstract 2: Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) Gene Therapy in Glioblastoma”

Giulia Lanzolla, MD, “Oral Abstract 3: Statins for Graves’ Orbitopathy (STAGO): results of a phase II randomized clinical trial”

Christine Dierks, “Oral Abstract 4: Lenvatinib/Pembrolizumab in Metastasized Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma (ATC): Interim results of the ATLEP Trial”

Iñigo Landa, PhD, “Oral Abstract 5: Tert mutant promoter mouse model induces cancer progression in BrafV600E-driven thyroid tumors: a novel tool to understand the biology of telomerase-reactivated thyroid cancers”

Pediatric Thyroid Symposium

Introduction: Andrew Bauer, MD

Systemic Therapies for Children with Refractory or Disseminated Thyroid Cancer

Moderator: Pallavi Iyer, MD

John Glod, MD, PhD, “Medical Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Cancer in Children”

Theodore Laetsch, MD, “Targeted Medical Therapies for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children”

Highlighted Pediatric Abstracts

Update on Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Children: Is There a Role for T3 or Newer Formulations?

Moderator: Jonathan Wasserman, MD

Gary Francis, MD, PhD Update on Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Children: Is There a Role for T3 or Newer Formulations?

Q&A and Networking

Moderators: Andrew Bauer, MD and Catherine Dinauer, MD

Surgical Symposium: Small Primary Cancers:  Observe, Ablate, or Operate?

Moderator: Mark Zafereo, MD

Yasuhiro Ito, MD, PhD, “Active Surveillance: Experience and Lessons Learned”

Jennifer Kuo, MD, “Highlights of the Data on Ablation”

Jonathon Russell, MD, “Surgical Considerations for Small Primary DTC”

Surgical Symposium: Management of Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

Moderator: Elizabeth Grubbs, MD

Laura Boucai, MD, “Surveillance and Non-Operative Options”

Linwah Yip, MD, “Operative Considerations for Recurrent Disease in the Central Neck”

David Shonka, MD, “Operative Considerations for Recurrent Disease in the Lateral Neck”

Thyroid Eye Disease Symposium

Co-Chairs: Henry Burch, MD and Petros Perros, MD

Susanne Neumann, PhD, “Pathophysiology of Thyroid Eye Disease – What have we learned about the underlying molecular mechanisms in recent years?”

Mario Salvi, MD and Marius Stan, MD, “Novel Medical Therapies for Thyroid Eye Disease – What and When?”

Henry Burch, MD and Petros Perros, MD, “Overview of the ATA/ETA Collaboration Developing a Statement Regarding the Management of Thyroid Eye Disease”

JP Brito, MD, “Initial Data from ATA and ETA Member Survey on Thyroid Eye Disease”

Suzanne Freitag, MD, “Is Surgical Management of Thyroid Eye Disease Changing with Available Medical Options?”

Highlights of ATA Research Grants

Co-Chairs: Joanna Klubo-Gwiezdzinska and Carmelo Nucera

Myriem Boufraqech, PhD, “Glutamine Metabolism is a new Therapeutic Target in Thyroid Cancer”

Oliver Clarke, PhD, “Structure Determination of Mammalian Thyroglobulin by cryoEM”

Cheuk Wun Li, PhD, “Novel Targeted Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases”

 

Sessions from Friday, October 1, 2021

Plenary: Lewis E. Braverman & Van Meter Award Distinguished Lectureships

Kenneth Burman, MD, “Thyroid Cancer: Translational and Clinical Studies”

Angela Leung, MD, MSc, “A Story of Too Little and Too Much Iodine and More”

Meet the Professor: Molecular testing in the era of personalized thyroid cancer therapy and its challenges 

Moderator: Ashish Chintakuntlawar, MD

Thomas Giordano, MD, PhD,Pathology Perspectives on Molecular Testing and Personalized Thyroid Cancer Therapy”

Mimi Hu, MD,Clinical Perspectives on Molecular Testing and Personalized Thyroid Cancer Therapy”

Meet the Professor: What's New in the Pathogenesis of Thyroid Autoimmunity

Moderator: Leonidas Duntas, MD

Francesca Coscia, PhD, “The structure of human thyroglobulin: implications in thyroid autoimmunity”

Giuseppe Barbesino, MD, “Clinical Update in Thyroid Autoimmunity”

Basic Science Oral Abstracts

Chair: Douglas Forrest, PhD

Andrea Bertolini “Oral Abstract 6: The Combination of L-Thyroxine and 3-Iodothyronamine Enhances Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Murine Model of Hypothyroidism”

Rosalie Sterenborg, MD, “Oral Abstract 7:  Identification of novel genetic determinants of serum TSH and fT4 levels in a large-scale association analysis of 87 thyroid hormone regulation genes”

Miles Miller, PhD. “Oral Abstract 8: Imaging Drug Accumulation and Inflammatory Responses in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer”

Alyaksandr Nikitski, MD, PhD, “Oral Abstract 9: ALK Inhibitors Reverse Downregulation of NIS and Restore the Radioiodine Uptake in Thyroid Cells Expressing STRN-ALK”

Kaushik Desai, “Oral Abstract 10: Evidence of interactions between thyroid hormones/receptors and glucose, fructose or methylglyoxal: Implications for thyroid dysfunction in metabolic syndrome”

Chromatin Modification by T3-TR

Co-Chairs: Anthony Hollenberg, MD and Sheue-yann Cheng, PhD

Yun-Bo Shi, PhD, “Chromatin disruption and histone modifications by thyroid hormone receptor during amphibian development”

Robert Denver, PhD, “Thyroid Hormone Induction of DNA Demethylation in Developing Brain”

Frances Carr, PhD, “T3-dependent Epigenetic Coordination by TR”

COVID-19 and the Thyroid

Co-Chairs: Rosella Elisei, MD and Peter Kopp, MD

Laura Fugazzola, MD, “The Spectrum of Thyroid Function Abnormalities in COVID-19 Patients”

David Ingbar, MD, “Treatment of SARS with L-T3”

Melissa Lechner, MD, PhD, “Analysis of Risk, Disparity and Outcomes in COVID-19 Patients with Thyroid Cancer”

Meet the Professor: Treatment of Hyperthyroidism: Past and Present

Moderator: Tracy Tylee, MD

Douglas Ross, MD, “Shifts in Treatment Preferences – Where we were, where we are, and where we're going”

Fereidoun Azizi, MD, “Long-term ATD – Is it a Better Way?”

Thyroid Cancer Through the Ages

Co-Chairs: Whitney Goldner, MD and Andrew Bauer, MD

Steven Waguespack, MD, “Perspectives From a Pediatric and Adult Endocrinologist: Advances and Gaps in Care Across the Age Spectrum”

Melanie Goldfarb, MD, “Challenges and Considerations in the Care of AYAs with Thyroid Cancer”

Maria Papaleontiou, MD, “Practical Considerations in Managing Thyroid Cancer in Older Adults”

 

Sessions from Saturday, October 2, 2021

Plenary: Celebrating 25 years of Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) Cloning and 80 years of NIS-based Radioiodine Therapy

Co-Chairs: John Morris, MD and Sissy Jhiang, PhD

Gregory Brent, MD, “NIS – The Basis of 80 years of Radioiodine Therapy in Benign and Malignant Disease”

Nancy Carrasco, MD, “NIS – The Journey Since its Cloning 25 Years Ago” (Dr. Carrasco did not give permission to post the recording of her talk.)

Meet the Professor: Global Trends in Thyroid Cancer Epidemiology

Moderator: Cari Kitahara, PhD

Salvatore Vaccarella, PhD, “Impact of Overdiagnosis on International Patterns in Thyroid Cancer Incidence and Mortality”

Susan Jordan, PhD, “Is There Evidence of True Increase in Incidence?”

Meet the Professor: Thyroid Challenges in Pregnancy

Moderator: Kris Poppe, MD, PhD

Kristien Boelaert, MD, PhD, “Preconception Counselling and Care for Pregnant Women with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease”

Angela Leung, MD, MSc, “Issues in the Pregnant or Lactating Patient with Thyroid Cancer”

Basic Science Oral Abstracts

Chair: John Copland, PhD

Rozita Bagheri-Yarmand, PhD, “Oral Abstract 16: RAC1 induces acquired dabrafenib resistance in association with anaplastic transformation in a papillary thyroid cancer patient”

Athanasios Bikas, MD, “Oral Abstract 17: Chlorpromazine Inhibits Mitochondrial Function, Induces DNA Damage and Inhibits Medullary Thyroid Cancer Cell Growth in vitro and in vivo”

Cole Davidson, “Oral Abstract 18: Glycogen Phosphorylase Inhibition Increases Reactive Oxygen Species to Induce Intrinsic Apoptosis in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer”

Yang Han, “Oral Abstract 19: Taking Advantage of the TGFB1 Biology in Radioiodine Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer to Stimulate Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS)-Mediated Iodide Uptake in Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells”

Xiaohan Zhang, MD, PhD, “Oral Abstract 20: A Novel Thyroglobulin Mutant Mouse Model to Study Goitrogenesis in Congenital Hypothyroidism”

Clinical and Translational Science Oral Abstracts

Chair: Wen Jiang, MD

Bixiao Zhao, “Oral Abstract 21: The Lactate Exporter Monocarboxylate Transporter 4 (MCT4) is a Marker of Poor Prognosis and a Therapeutic Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer”

Elisa Pasqual, “Oral Abstract 22: Risk of second primary malignancies after radioactive iodine treatment for thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years: a SEER (1975-2017) database analysis”

Steven Waguespack, MD, “Oral Abstract 23: Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Larotrectinib in Patients with Advanced TRK Fusion-positive Thyroid Carcinoma”

Vincenzo Condello, PhD, “Oral Abstract 24: Gene Expression Signature for Detecting Invasion in Thyroid Tumors Driven by RAS Mutations”

Marcia Brose, MD, PhD, “Oral Abstract 25: Cabozantinib Versus Placebo in Patients With Radioiodine-Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC) Who Have Progressed After Prior VEGFR-Targeted Therapy: Updated Results From the Phase 3 COSMIC-311 Trial and Prespecified Subgroup Analyses Based on Prior VEGFR-targeted Therapy”

Celebrating 10 Years of FDA Approved Novel Treatments for Thyroid Cancer

Co-Chairs: Steven Sherman, MD and Lori Wirth, MD

Manisha Shah, MD, “Targeted Therapies in DTC and MTC: Where Have we Started and What Have we Achieved”

Keith Bible, MD, PhD, “Update in Management of Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: 2021 ATA Guidelines”

Maria Cabanillas, MD, “Current and Upcoming Clinical Trials in Thyroid Cancer”

Defects in Deiodination Pathways With Clinical Significance

Chair: Monica Dentice, PhD

Alexandra Dumitrescu, MD, PhD, “Loss-of-Function Mutations of DIO1”

Jose Moreno, MD, PhD, “Loss-of-Function Mutations of DIO2”

Domenico Salvatore, MD, PhD, “Syndromes of DIO3 Reactivation”

Meet the Professor: Definitive Management of Thyrotoxic Conditions

Moderator: Cord Sturgeon, MD

Brian Kim, MD, “Consideration for Surgery vs RAI Referral”

Susan Pitt, MD, “Preop Management of the Thyrotoxic Patient, Operative Considerations and Challenges, and Postop Challenges”

Treatment for Hypothyroidism A Changing Paradigm

Co-Chairs: Laszlo Hegedüs, MD, DMSc and Anne Cappola, MD, ScM

Jacqueline Jonklaas, MD, PhD, “When and How to Use LT3 and LT4 Today”

Colin Dayan, MA, FRCP, PhD, “Clinical Trials Underway”

Antonio Bianco, MD, PhD, “New Formulations of Liothyronine”

 

Sessions from Sunday, October 3, 2021

Plenary: Arthur Bauman Clinical Symposium: Disparities in thyroid care: Bridging the gaps

Co-Chairs: M. Regina Castro, MD and Ernest Asamoah, MD

Julie Ann Sosa, MD, “Disparities in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Care”

Emad Kandil, MD, “Disparities in Surgical Management of Thyroid Disease”

Donald McLeod, MBBS, MPH, PhD, “Disparities in Management of Graves’ Disease”

Meet the Professor: Thyroid Emergencies

Moderator: Andrew Gianoukakis, MD

Takashi Akamizu, MD, PhD, “Thyroid Storm: Myths and Facts”

Anu Sharma, MD, “Thyroid Lymphoma: A Diagnosis to consider in the Rapidly Enlarging Thyroid Mass”

Meet the Professor: Disorders of Thyroid Function with a Genetic Basis

Moderator: Roy Weiss, MD, PhD

Carla Moran, MB, PhD, “Update on Syndromes of Resistance to Thyroid Hormone”

W. Edward Visser, MD, PhD, “Diagnosis and Therapy in Patients with MCT8 Deficiency”

Basic Science Oral Abstracts

Chair: Jeffrey Knauf, PhD

Melissa Lechner, MD, PhD, “Oral Abstract 26: IL-17A axis Blockade Protects against Thyroid Immune-related Adverse Events (IrAEs) while Enhancing Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor (ICI) Anti-tumor Efficacy”

Victoria Casado-Medrano, PhD, “Oral Abstract 27: Interplay Between Thyroid Dysfunction and Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis”

Lorraine De Oliveira, PhD, “Oral Abstract 28: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes as a Novel Approach to Investigate Thyroid Hormone Action and Signaling”

Jin Zhou, PhD, “Oral Abstract 29: Thyroid hormone decreases hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in a dietary mouse model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)”

Pouya Alikhani, “Oral Abstract 30: Iodotyrosines biomark hypothyroidism caused by environmental disruptor TBBPA”

Clinical and Translational Science Oral Abstracts

Chair: Sara Ahmadi, MD

Ilaria Muller, MD, PhD, “Oral Abstract 31: Randomized Controlled Trial of Belimumab and Methylprednisolone in Active Moderate-Severe Graves' Orbitopathy”

David Lui, “Oral Abstract 32: The impact of interferon beta-1b therapy on thyroid function and autoimmunity among COVID-19 survivors”

George Kahaly, MD, PhD, “Oral Abstract 33: TEPROTUMUMAB FOR THYROID EYE DISEASE (TED): EFFICACY IN LONGER DURATION DISEASE, RETREATMENT AND LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP”

Oscar Roa Dueñas, “Oral Abstract 34: Thyroid Status and Brain Circulation: The Rotterdam Study”

Francesco Celi, MD, MHSc, “Oral Abstract 35: Acute Effects of Liothyronine Administration on Cardiovascular System and Energy Metabolism”

Clark T. Sawin Historical Vignette: Edwin B. Astwood and the Development of the Antithyroid Drugs

David Cooper, MD

Jerome Hershman, MD

 

 

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy for Thyroid Cancer: Current State and Future Directions

Co-Chairs: Bhavana Konda, MD, MPH and Mabel Ryder, MD

Bryan Haugen, MD, “Pembrolizumab and Lenvatinib – A Powerful Duo in Differentiated and Undifferentiated Thyroid Cancer”

Anupam Kotwal, MD, “Management of Endocrine Side Effects of Immunotherapy”

Padmanee Sharma, MD, PhD, “Future of Immunotherapy in Cancer: Beyond Immune Check Point Inhibitors”

NIS & Radioiodine: What’s in the Pipeline?

Co-Chairs: Pilar Santisteban, PhD and Christine Spitzweg, MD

James Fagin, MD, “Pathophysiology of Radioiodine-Refractory DTC”

Sophie Leboulleux, MD,  “Update on Redifferentiation Trials in Radioiodine-Refractory DTC”

Chris McCabe, PhD, “New Insights into the Regulation of NIS Expression and Function”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credits

Accreditation Statement/Credit

Course Name:  90th  Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association Enduring Materials        

Release Date:  October 18, 2021

Expiration Date:  August 31, 2022

Estimated time to complete the activity: 

Contact for questions:  Josette Paige jpaige@thyroid.org

Target audience:  MD/Dos, PhDs, PAs, NPs, Nurses, endocrinologists, surgeons, basic scientists, nuclear medicine professionals, pathologists, radiologists, internists, oncologists

Statement of need/program Overview:  ATA is the leading organization dedicated to the advancement, understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disorders and thyroid cancer. The ATA annual meeting offers the best vehicle worldwide for all disciplines and specialties to share information, improve detection and treatment of thyroid disease, advance basic and clinical thyroid research, and improve patient outcomes.

 

Presentation/Course objectives:   

1. Understand diagnostic tools (imaging, cytologic, and molecular) used in the evaluation of thyroid nodules and their role in determining management.

2. Identify less invasive, imaging-based methods in the management of thyroid nodules and/or small thyroid cancers.

3. Understand new discoveries in thyroid hormone action, metabolism and transport and applications toward improved patient care.

4. Identify newest practice guidelines and staging system of anaplastic thyroid cancer and understand how to implement these changes in order to improve patient care.

5. Identify novel treatment opportunities for advanced thyroid cancers using emerging genomic data as well as novel cancer therapies.

6. Identify emerging treatment approaches for Graves’ disease as well as Graves’ ophthalmopathy within a multidisciplinary practice.

7. Understand translational studies in thyroidology that have led to novel clinical strategies for benign and malignant thyroid disease.

8. Understand the impact of COVID on thyroid function and on thyroid patient care

9. Understand recent clinical and basic research developments in thyroid autoimmunity

10. Understand special aspects of clinical thyroidology in the pediatric patient, pregnant women, and older adults

11. Understand the molecular basis of radioiodine accumulation in the thyroid gland and its clinical implications and novel developments for improved patient care

12. Understand and identify disparities in care of patients with thyroid disorders (autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid cancer), including issues with access to medical and surgical resources

13. Understand epidemiological trends in thyroid cancer and autoimmune thyroid disease

14. Understand new discoveries on etiologies of thyroid disorders, including genetic alterations and environmental factors

 

Planners/directors: Michael McDermott, MD MICHAEL.MCDERMOTT@CUANSCHUTZ.EDU

 

Disclosure summary: FACULTY DISCLOSURES

SPONSOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Accreditation & Designation Statement: 

Continuing Education Credit Enduring

This activity was planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of The University of Colorado School of Medicine and the American Thyroid Association. The University of Colorado School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation

The University of Colorado School of Medicine designated this enduring material activity for a maximum of 37.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

                                                             

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to:

  • earn up to 37.25 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program; and
  • earn their required annual part II self-assessment credit in the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery’s Continuing Certification program (formerly known as MOC); and
  • earn credit toward the CME and Self-Assessment requirements of the American Board of Surgery’s Continuous Certification program

It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM and/or ABOHNS and/or ABS.

To earn board credit, the attendee must participate in the CME activity including the evaluation component.  By participating in this event and requesting board credit, I understand that my learner completion data will be shared with the ACCME and the applicable certifying board(s).

 

Disclosure of Conflict of Interest

As a sponsor accredited by the ACCME, the University of Colorado School of Medicine must ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all its sponsored educational activities. All speakers/faculty/contributors participating in a sponsored activity are expected to disclose to the provider any relevant personal financial interest or other relationship involving themselves or their spouse/partner within the last 12 months with any proprietary entity producing health care goods or services (excluding nonprofit or government organizations) related to the content of the activity.

Consistent with the University of Colorado School of Medicine policy, speakers/faculty/contributors for this activity are expected to disclose any economic or other personal interests that create, or may be perceived as creating, a conflict related to the material discussed. This policy is intended to make you aware of speaker/faculty/contributor’s interests, so you may form your own judgments about such material. In addition, consistent with University of Colorado School of Medicine policy, speakers/faculty/contributors are expected to disclose to you at the beginning of their presentation(s) any product mentioned during their presentation that is not labeled for the use under discussion or is still investigational.

To earn credit participants must:  Watch training and submit evaluation.

Evaluation link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ATAEM21

Schedule of credit reporting and dissemination:

Completion of Learning Assessment by Participant

CME Certificates sent to Attendee

October 5, 2021 – December 31, 2021

January 15, 2022

January 1, 2022 – March 31, 2022

April 15, 2022

April 1, 2022 – June 30, 2022

July 15, 2022

July 1, 2022 – August 31, 2022

October 15, 2022

 

 

 




Accreditation Statement/Credit

Course Name:  90th  Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association Enduring Materials        

Release Date:  October 18, 2021

Expiration Date:  August 31, 2022

Estimated time to complete the activity: 

Contact for questions:  Josette Paige jpaige@thyroid.org

Target audience:  MD/Dos, PhDs, PAs, NPs, Nurses, endocrinologists, surgeons, basic scientists, nuclear medicine professionals, pathologists, radiologists, internists, oncologists

Statement of need/program Overview:  ATA is the leading organization dedicated to the advancement, understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disorders and thyroid cancer. The ATA annual meeting offers the best vehicle worldwide for all disciplines and specialties to share information, improve detection and treatment of thyroid disease, advance basic and clinical thyroid research, and improve patient outcomes.

 

Presentation/Course objectives:   

1. Understand diagnostic tools (imaging, cytologic, and molecular) used in the evaluation of thyroid nodules and their role in determining management.

2. Identify less invasive, imaging-based methods in the management of thyroid nodules and/or small thyroid cancers.

3. Understand new discoveries in thyroid hormone action, metabolism and transport and applications toward improved patient care.

4. Identify newest practice guidelines and staging system of anaplastic thyroid cancer and understand how to implement these changes in order to improve patient care.

5. Identify novel treatment opportunities for advanced thyroid cancers using emerging genomic data as well as novel cancer therapies.

6. Identify emerging treatment approaches for Graves’ disease as well as Graves’ ophthalmopathy within a multidisciplinary practice.

7. Understand translational studies in thyroidology that have led to novel clinical strategies for benign and malignant thyroid disease.

8. Understand the impact of COVID on thyroid function and on thyroid patient care

9. Understand recent clinical and basic research developments in thyroid autoimmunity

10. Understand special aspects of clinical thyroidology in the pediatric patient, pregnant women, and older adults

11. Understand the molecular basis of radioiodine accumulation in the thyroid gland and its clinical implications and novel developments for improved patient care

12. Understand and identify disparities in care of patients with thyroid disorders (autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid cancer), including issues with access to medical and surgical resources

13. Understand epidemiological trends in thyroid cancer and autoimmune thyroid disease

14. Understand new discoveries on etiologies of thyroid disorders, including genetic alterations and environmental factors

 

Planners/directors: Michael McDermott, MD MICHAEL.MCDERMOTT@CUANSCHUTZ.EDU

 

Disclosure summary: FACULTY DISCLOSURES

SPONSOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Accreditation & Designation Statement: 

Continuing Education Credit Enduring

This activity was planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of The University of Colorado School of Medicine and the American Thyroid Association. The University of Colorado School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation

The University of Colorado School of Medicine designated this enduring material activity for a maximum of 37.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

                                                             

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to:

  • earn up to 37.25 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program; and
  • earn their required annual part II self-assessment credit in the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery’s Continuing Certification program (formerly known as MOC); and
  • earn credit toward the CME and Self-Assessment requirements of the American Board of Surgery’s Continuous Certification program

It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM and/or ABOHNS and/or ABS.

To earn board credit, the attendee must participate in the CME activity including the evaluation component.  By participating in this event and requesting board credit, I understand that my learner completion data will be shared with the ACCME and the applicable certifying board(s).

 

Disclosure of Conflict of Interest

As a sponsor accredited by the ACCME, the University of Colorado School of Medicine must ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all its sponsored educational activities. All speakers/faculty/contributors participating in a sponsored activity are expected to disclose to the provider any relevant personal financial interest or other relationship involving themselves or their spouse/partner within the last 12 months with any proprietary entity producing health care goods or services (excluding nonprofit or government organizations) related to the content of the activity.

Consistent with the University of Colorado School of Medicine policy, speakers/faculty/contributors for this activity are expected to disclose any economic or other personal interests that create, or may be perceived as creating, a conflict related to the material discussed. This policy is intended to make you aware of speaker/faculty/contributor’s interests, so you may form your own judgments about such material. In addition, consistent with University of Colorado School of Medicine policy, speakers/faculty/contributors are expected to disclose to you at the beginning of their presentation(s) any product mentioned during their presentation that is not labeled for the use under discussion or is still investigational.

To earn credit participants must:  Watch training and submit evaluation.

Evaluation link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ATAEM21

Schedule of credit reporting and dissemination:

Completion of Learning Assessment by Participant

CME Certificates sent to Attendee

October 5, 2021 – December 31, 2021

January 15, 2022

January 1, 2022 – March 31, 2022

April 15, 2022

April 1, 2022 – June 30, 2022

July 15, 2022

July 1, 2022 – August 31, 2022

October 15, 2022

 

 

 

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